Turn and Test for Daylight Saving Time

 Smoke Detect
It is almost time to spring forward for Daylight Saving Time.

When setting your clock ahead one hour on Sunday, March 12, make sure your smoke alarms are working, and check that the batteries have plenty of charge. It is also a great time to check the expiration dates of your emergency supplies.

A smoke alarm with a dead or missing battery is the same as having no smoke alarm at all. Take care of your smoke alarms according to the manufacturer instructions, and follow these tips from the U.S. Fire Administration:

·         Smoke alarm powered by a nine-volt battery – Test the alarm monthly. Replace the batteries at least once every year. Replace
the entire smoke alarm every 10 years.

·         Smoke alarm powered by a 10-year lithium (or “long-life”) battery – Test the alarm monthly. Since you cannot (and should
not) replace the lithium battery, replace the entire smoke alarm according to the manufacturer’s instructions and dispose of it
properly at a household hazardous waste site or by sending it back to the manufacturer.

·         Smoke alarm that is hardwired into your home’s electrical system – Test the alarm monthly. Replace the backup battery at
least once every year. Replace the entire smoke alarm every 10 years.

Replace any of your emergency supplies that will expire within the next six months and use the old supplies before they expire. Some examples of items that can expire are:

  • ·         Water
  • ·         Food
  • ·         Prescription medications
  • ·         First-aid supplies
  • ·         Batteries

For more information on emergency supplies, visit Ready.gov.

Protect Yourself During a Flood

This graphic warns about driving around barricades during a flood, and encourages people to be safe. The text reads as follows: "Please do not drive around barricades. Be safe." Created by Loretta Kuo. Original photo by Steve Zumwalt/FEMA. Location: West Alton, Mo., June 6, 2013 -- Missouri Route 94 flooded.

This graphic warns about driving around barricades during a flood, and encourages people to be safe. The text reads as follows: “Please do not drive around barricades. Be safe.”
Created by Loretta Kuo.
Original photo by Steve Zumwalt/FEMA. Location: West Alton, Mo., June 6, 2013 — Missouri Route 94 flooded.

Flooding is the most common natural disaster in the United States. Deadly flooding can happen anywhere and faster than you might expect.

It is important to be prepared for flooding, if you live in a low-lying area near a body of water, such as a river, stream, or culvert. You should also be wary if you live along a coastline or downstream from a dam, levee, or area that has been burned by wildfire.

 

Protect yourself during a flood with these Ready.gov tips:

Turn Around, Don’t Drown! Avoid walking or driving through flood waters. Just six (6) inches of moving water can knock you down. Just one (1) foot of water can sweep your vehicle off the roadway.

If there is a chance of flash flooding, move immediately to higher ground. Flash floods are the #1 cause of weather-related deaths in the U.S.If floodwaters rise around your car, but the water is not moving, if you are able, get out of the car and walk to higher ground. Do not leave the car if the water is rapidly moving. If water is rising inside the car, then seek refuge on the roof.Avoid camping or parking along streams, rivers, and creeks during heavy rainfall. These areas can flood quickly with little warning.

For more information download the America’s PrepareAthon! How to Prepare for a Flood guide.